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Senegal: Adaptation to Coastal Erosion In Vulnerable Areas

Submitted by Tahia Devissche... 13th July 2010 9:57


Status: Approved

Project approved for funding by the Adaptation Fund Board, June 2010

Project Description

The coastal regions of Senegal are home to over 75% of the population and are the major economic regions of the country. The coastal areas are threatened with inundation and salinization as a result of sea-level rise due to climate change. In line with the priorities for adaptation outlined in Senegal's National Adaptation Programme of Action, this project, funded through the Adaptation Fund and implemented by Senegal's National Implementing Agency, the Centre de Suivi Écologique, will focus on effective implementation of adaptation measures in the coastal sites of Rufisque, Saly, and Joal. Specific objectives of this project are:

1) Implement the actions to protect the coastal areas of Rufisque, Saly, and Joal against erosion, with the aim to protect houses and the economic infrastructures threatened by the erosion including fish processing areas, fishing docks, tourism or cultural infrastructures, and restore lost or threatened activities;

2) Implement the actions to fight the salinization of agricultural lands used to grow rice in Joal, with the construction of anti-salt dikes;

3) Assist local communities of the coastal area of Joal, especially women, in handling solid wastes and fish processing areas of the districts located along the littoral;

4) Communicate on adaptation, sensitize and train local people on climate change adaptation techniques in coastal areas and on good practices, to avoid an aggravation of the various situations encountered;

5) Develop and implement the appropriate regulations for the management of coastal areas.

Project Details

National Implementing Agency: Centre de Suivi Ecologique

Executing agencies: Directorate of Environment of Senegal and NGOs and CBOs

Proposed value: $8,619,000

Duration of project: July 2010-Aug 2012