Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters

CRED, the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters, has been active for over 30 years in the fields of international disaster and conflict health studies, with research and training activities linking relief, rehabilitation and development. CRED promotes research, training and technical expertise on humanitarian emergencies, with a special focus on public health and epidemiology.
 
The Centre undertakes research and provides an evidence base on the burden of disease and health issues arising from disasters and conflicts to improve needs-based preparedness and responses to humanitarian emergencies.

EM-DAT: International Disaster Database

Since 1988 the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) has been maintaining an Emergency Events Database EM-DAT. EM-DAT was created with the initial support of the WHO and the Belgian Government.

The main objective of the database is to serve the purposes of humanitarian action at national and international levels. It is an initiative aimed to rationalise decision making for disaster preparedness, as well as providing an objective base for vulnerability assessment and priority setting.

EM-DAT contains essential core data on the occurrence and effects of over 18,000 mass disasters in the world from 1900 to present. The database is compiled from various sources, including UN agencies, non-governmental organisations, insurance companies, research institutes and press agencies.

If you are interested in disasters, please visit our EM-DAT Website.

CE-DAT: Complex Emergency Database

The Complex Emergency Database (CE-DAT) is an international initiative that monitors and evaluates the health status of populations affected by complex emergencies. CE-DAT is managed by the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) and was created in 2003 as an outcome of SMART, an interagency initiative to encourage rational, evidence-driven humanitarian decision-making.

CE-DAT is a database of mortality and malnutrition rates - the most commonly used public health indicators of the severity of a humanitarian crisis. Field agencies use mortality and nutrition indicators to identify and measure the severity of needs in order to prioritize human and financial resources. These indicators have also been shown to be useful in monitoring the extent to which the relief system is meeting the needs of vulnerable populations and thus the overall impact and effectiveness of the relief system.

If you are interested in complex emergency, please visit our CE-DAT Website.

10419786195 ff6938f8b0 z - climate adaptation.

Stakeholders’ Perception on National Heatwave Plans in Belgium

This study assessed the perceptions of key stakeholders in Belgium on their responsibilities and the effectiveness of the local implementation of national heat wave plans in Brussels.

Read more
Photo by European Commission DG ECHO (source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/69583224@N05/)

Enhancers of child nutritional status in post-flood rural settings

This article explores the role of education in reducing the societal impacts of extreme flood events, particularly with regards to post-flood child undernutrition.

Read more
15flood affected odisha - climate adaptation.

Flooding and Child Undernutrition in Rural India

Climate change threats to rural India: Flooding linked to child undernutrition, particularly child wasting. Repeated flooding was associated to 3 times higher prevalence of severe wasting.

Read more